The Centre for the History of European Discourses was incorporated in the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities in August 2015.

The information in this website is therefore out of date but retained for archival and staff purposes.

Peter Harrison, The Territories of Science and Religion (Chicago, 2015)

The conflict between science and religion seems indelible, even eternal. Surely two such divergent views of the universe have always been in fierce opposition? Actually, that’s not the case, says Peter Harrison: our very concepts of science an...

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Philip Almond, The Devil: A New Biography (I.B. Taurus, 2014)

It is often said that the devil has all the best tunes. He also has as many names as he has guises. Lucifer, Mephistopheles, Beelzebub (in Christian thought), Ha-Satan or the Adversary (in Jewish scripture) and Iblis or Shaitan (in Islamic tradition...

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Philip Almond, The Lancashire Witches: A Chronicle of Sorcery and Death on Pendle Hill (I.B. Taurus, 2012)

In the febrile religious and political climate of late sixteenth-century England, when the grip of the Reformation was as yet fragile and insecure, and underground papism still perceived to be rife, Lancashire was felt by the Protestant authorities ...

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Simon During, Against Democracy: Literary Experiences in the Era of Emancipation (Fordham University Press, 2012)

This book argues that we can no longer envision a political system that might practically displace democracy or, more accurately, global democratic state capitalism. Democracy has become fundamental: It extends deeper and deeper into everyday life; ...

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Peter Hallward and Knox Peden (eds), Concept and Form, vol 1: Key Texts from the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (Verso, 2012)

Concept and Form is a two-volume monument to the work of the philosophy journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966–69), the most ambitious and radical collective project to emerge from French structuralism. Inspired by th...

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Peter Hallward and Knox Peden (eds), Concept and Form, vol 2: Interviews and Essays on the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (Verso, 2012)

Concept and Form is a two-volume monument to the work of the philosophy journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966–69), the most ambitious and radical collective project to emerge from French structuralism. Inspired by th...

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Gary Ianziti, Writing History in Renaissance Italy: Leonardo Bruni and the Uses of the Past (Harvard, 2012)

Leonardo Bruni (1370–1444) is widely recognized as the most important humanist historian of the early Renaissance. But why this recognition came about—and what it has meant for the field of historiography—has long been a matter of ...

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Michael Ostling, Between the Devil and the Host: Imagining Witchcraft in Early Modern Poland (Oxford, 2012)

Outside the imagination, witches don't exist. But in Poland and in Europe and its colonies in the early modern period, people imagined their neighbours to be witches, with tragic results. For the first time in English, Michael Ostling tells the stor...

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Ian Hesketh, The Science of History in Victorian Britain (Pickering & Chatto, 2011)

New attitudes towards history in nineteenth-century Britain saw a rejection of romantic, literary techniques in favour of a professionalized, scientific methodology. The development of history as a scientific discipline was undertaken by several key...

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Peter Harrison, Ronald L. Numbers, and Michael H. Shank (eds), Wrestling with Nature: From Omens to Science (Chicago, 2011)

When and where did science begin? Historians have offered different answers to these questions, some pointing to Babylonian observational astronomy, some to the speculations of natural philosophers of ancient Greece. Others have opted for early mode...

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Elizabeth Stephens, Anatomy as Spectacle: Public Exhibitions of the Body from 1700 to the Present (Liverpool, 2011)

From the eighteenth century to the present, public exhibitions of human anatomy have proved popular with a wide range of audiences, being marketed as both educational and entertaining. In Anatomy as Spectacle, Elizabeth Stephens takes us on...

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Peter Cryle and Alison Moore, Frigidity: An Intellectual History (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)

Frigidity: An Intellectual History is the first major study of this curiously neglected term in the history of sexuality. It represents an exciting new approach to culturally informed intellectual history and is essential reading for studen...

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Philip Almond, England's First Demonologist: Reginald Scot and 'The Discoverie of Witchcraft' (I.B. Tauris, 2011)

'The fables of witchcraft have taken so fast hold and deepe root in the heart of man, that few or none can indure with patience the hand and correction of God.' Reginald Scot, whose words these are, published his remarkable book The Discoverie of Wi...

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Shaunnagh Dorsett and Ian Hunter (eds), Law and Politics in British Colonial Thought (Palgrave Macmillan 2010)

With the exhaustion of postcolonial studies, and following the historical turn in studies of European imperialism, the time is ripe for a more sharply historical consideration of the role of European legal thought in processes of colonial governance...

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Peter Harrison (ed), Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion (CUP, 2010)

In recent years, the relations between science and religion have been the object of renewed attention. Developments in physics, biology and the neurosciences have reinvigorated discussions about the nature of life and ultimate reality. At the same t...

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Ian Hesketh, Of Apes and Ancestors: Evolution, Christianity, and the Oxford Debate (Toronto, 2009)

Tell me, sir, is it on your grandmother's or your grandfather's side that you are descended from an ape? In June of 1860, some of Britain's most influential scientific and religious authorities gathered in Oxford to hear a heated debat...

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Elizabeth Stephens, Queer Writing: Homoeroticism in Jean Genet's Fiction (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009)

This book provides the first full-length study of Jean Genet's homoerotic writing but also makes an important intervention in wider queer criticism. Stephens explores Genet's reflections on the difficulties of writing homoerotically within an inhere...

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Simon During, Exit Capitalism: Literary Culture, Theory and Post-Secular Modernity (Routledge, 2009)

Exit Capitalism explores a new path for cultural studies and re-examines key moments of British cultural and literary history. Simon During argues that the long and liberating journey towards democratic state capitalism has led to an unhapp...

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Peter Cryle and Christopher Forth (eds), Sexuality at the Fin de Siècle (University of Delaware Press, 2008)

It has come to be widely accepted that “sexuality” as we know it took shape at the end of the nineteenth century. This is when Krafft-Ebing asserted that “sexual feeling is really the root of all ethics, and no doubt aestheticism a...

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Philip Almond, The Witches of Warboys (I.B. Taurus, 2008)

On a foggy November day in 1589, when one of the five daughters of Robert and Elizabeth Throckmorton suddenly fell sick, no one in the small English village of Warboys could have predicted the terrifying events that would follow. Or envisaged that f...

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Ian Hunter, The Secularisation of the Confessional State: The Political Thought of Christian Thomasius (CUP, 2007)

Christian Thomasius (1655–1728) was a tireless campaigner against the political enforcement of religion in the early modern confessional state. In a whole series of combative disputations - against heresy and witchcraft prosecutions, and in fa...

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Peter Harrison, The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science (CUP, 2007)

Peter Harrison provides an account of the religious foundations of scientific knowledge. He shows how the approaches to the study of nature that emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were directly informed by theological discussions abo...

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Ian Hunter,Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (ed and trans), Christian Thomasius: Essays on Church, State, and Politics (Liberty Fund, 2007)

The essays selected here for translation derive largely from Thomasius's work on Staatskirchenrecht, or the political jurisprudence of church law. These works, originating as disputations, theses, and pamphlets, were direct interventions in the unre...

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Conal Condren, Stephen Gaukroger, and Ian Hunter (eds), The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe (CUP, 2006)

In this groundbreaking collection of essays the history of philosophy appears in a fresh light, not as reason's progressive discovery of its universal conditions, but as a series of unreconciled disputes over the proper way to conduct oneself as a p...

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Philip Almond, Demonic Possession and Exorcism in Early Modern England (CUP, 2004)

Exclusively devoted to demonic possession amd exorcism in early modern England, this book offers modernized versions of the most significant texts on nine cases of demonic possession from 1570 to 1650. The nine stories of demonic possession were eit...

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Ian Hunter, Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Germany (CUP, 2001)

Rival Enlightenments, first published in 2001, is a major reinterpretation of early modern German intellectual history. Ian Hunter approaches philosophical doctrines as ways of fashioning personae for envisaged historical circumstances, her...

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